Tag: economy

If you’re going to sell yourself, at least be expensive

If you’re going to sell yourself, at least be expensive

Jamaica has been selling off bits and pieces for ages, be it bauxite rights, our port (leased out) or even the sugar belt and Goat Island which has been granted to the Chinese, we see where Jamaica has been slowly at first, but rather quickly recently, giving away key areas and industries of the nation. Now, this has naturally brought out the nationalistic tendencies in us human beings that inhabit this island, we have been demanding that the government reverse these policies and staunchly go it alone, or at the very most engage in trade with others while retaining sovereignty of our key industries (electricity, bauxite etc). Now I am staunchly in this camp, I feel that alone (really as a unified Caribbean basin) we can have a real go at making something of ourselves as a nation and region.

That, however, for the time being, is a pipe dream. The powers that be are intent on selling off any area and aspect of the nation that can turn a quick few $US million. Now I don’t agree with this line of thinking, but if our leaders are indeed going down the road of selling off everything lock-stock and barrel then by god let us ensure that they get quite a few $US Billion while also ensuring that the people (that would be us the citizens of the neo-colony) get some benefits.

Take for example the on again off again sale of Goat Island and the aborted deal for the port (both Chinese deals), it is obvious that the Chinese are looking for a firm foothold in the region, more specifically the areas in the region closest to the major shipping lanes (from the Panama Canal to the Port of Miami and further up the eastern US seaboard), that is why they have pumped so much money into the Cuban refitting of the Port of Mariel. Now the Chinese are not silly, they know that absolutely no cargo ships are allowed to dock in the US after directly docking at Cuba, they need a mid-point therefore. This is where Jamaica and us being a potential expensive hoe come into play. If they want the port and the Island and the Government is intent on selling it, then sell it, but go big. Sell them both for XBillion US$ and demand concessions and access to the port, sell them and insist that they fund and train our merchant marine fleet (which they will need for their ships coming in) so that we can have some lasting benefits as it relates to the individual Jamaican.

 

 

 

The mining rights is also a case of the same thing. China is the hub of global industry and manufacturing and is also fast ascending as it relates to R&D, therefore it is natural that they want to (and they are) monopolize the minerals of the world. Again we see where the differing administrations are intent on selling it to the Chinese, in line with the old school sell-offs where we end up carrying the bag. It doesn’t have to be this way, Let us sell it to them, but let us make them pay dearly. Insist that when we sell the bauxite rights (again for a cool X Billion $US), demand in the deal that the roads and rail networks are upgraded. This again is something  that would benefit both parties, the Chinese would need good, reliable transportation networks to transport the minerals (or processed aluminum) to the docks so that they can be loaded into the awaiting ships, we the Jamaican citizen would also benefit greatly as we would then have cash on hand along with a brand new road and rail network we didn’t have to build.

Now I am not saying that the Chinese are looking to or are going to become our new colonial overlords, I have never been in that camp and the facts (though they point to exploitation and no-strings-attached loans/grants) do not point in that direction, they do however wish to gain a permanent foothold in the region as they aim to cement their status as the next global behemoth. If we are going to sell our souls, sell off our natural gifts and key industries, then lets at least have something to show for it, let it not be a case of us selling off everything we have only to realize that we own nothing, have access to nothing and are left scrounging for the ‘what lef’ in ways that would make our current reality look like a fun game.

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Stop playing games with sports

Jamaicans have  mad passion for sports, be it the man who plays community football every Sunday, or the woman who goes all out in our local netball leagues, we indulge in sports. Even if they have never played on an actual team or ever kicked a ball they watch with baited breath Manning Cup matches and Jamaica Trials. Put in a nutshell Jamaica is a sports happy nation that is also home to some of the worlds best athletes and coaches.

Yet here we are, some thirteen years since the start of our prolonged athletic dominance (see VCB at the ’04 Athens Games) and some twenty years since our qualification for the World Cup and we are still yet to realize that sports is so much more than a game.

Sports is both an industry and entertainment, it is a multi-billion dollar entity which we as a nation are failing to tap into. Staying with the obvious (track and field) Jamaica has been at the top of the pack for over a decade, yet we do not tap into that for monetary purposes. We do not for example have a world class training camp where foreign athletes can come down for some r&r or intensive training, nor do we have in place a training program for foreign coaches so that they can tap into our methods (and we can tap into their wallets). If we are to not only retain our position as kings of the track but also leave a lasting mark on the sport then we need to seriously monetize track and mimic what they have in Eugene, Oregon (a hub of track and field where international athletes and coaches are hosted).

Football isn’t spared from this insanity, in fact it is the poster child for Jamaica’s failure to adjust to the realities and potentials of the modern sports industry. Now football has been drunk on  money since the 90’s, more so in the past five years, and Jamaica is a nation where football is king, yet we for some reason refuse to tap into that rich vein. We refuse to professionalize our league (we have only recently become semi-pro) and we (as individual clubs) refuse to become feeder clubs to European clubs in Belgium and the Netherlands (where work permits are easier to come by), thereby seriously limiting the potential finances that the clubs could make. More to the point in this day and age where clubs like Manchester United and Real Madrid travel the world on summer tours and pre-season tournaments, Jamaica with its tourist pedigree and its passion for sports cant seem to organize even a one off tournament with these teams that are both available and actively looking to expand there market base (plus it would both boost our tourism product while improving our standard of local football).

We see the same in netball where we continue to rest on our laurels while failing to realize that we are sitting on a potential goldmine. With a national team that averages a global ranking of between third to fifth in the world (while still having no professional league) we refuse to take advantage of the fact that we possess some of the best athletes and coaches. We could (just like track and field) share our knowledge and nous of the game. We should be creating a league that seeks to attract the best players in the region and then televise it through Sportsmax for example (which is highly under-supplied). In one felt swoop we would have cemented the regional viewership, expanded your product (the Jamaican netball league) to foreign shores  while ensuring that we remain as one of the hubs of the game globally.

Sports could and should be placed on the front burner by both parties and especially any person who wishes to be a tourist minister. With so much money just sloshing around, literally begging to be pocketed, we refuse to monetize sports. We have a perfectly good Multi-purpose stadium on the north coast that we have allowed to become a white elephant rather than expanding into the sports tourism market. We don’t use it to host cricket (we could host the subcontinental teams and tap into their massive diaspora in the states) and we don’t use it to host football matches (where we could integrate our football product with our tourism product). Instead of doing these obvious movements towards getting involved in the international sports market we continue to dither and laud the fact that we have gotten some third rate IAAF sanctioned meet while the Bahamas hosts the premiere world relay meet.

We need to wise up and realize that sports is about more than running up and down, more than having fun and winning, it is an industry, one that we are apart of but not taking advantage of and that is insane.A change must be made in how we view sports and how we integrate it into our economy. Too much chatting has been done and not enough action when it comes to monetizing sports and that has to change, the private sector along with the state must realize that there is a massive amount of money that we are not sharing in, an industry tailor-made for us. Let us push our politicians to promote and push sports, let us see the private sector realize that the sporting industry can be and is profitable and let us finally harness the sporting potential that this nation has, to not do so would be criminal.