Tag: environmentalism

Regional integration could mean moving to Guyana and Suriname

Regional integration could mean moving to Guyana and Suriname

CARICOM, as is, is dead. It is going nowhere fast, what with all the dick-swinging, animosity, regional tension, economic tension and social tensions, CARICOM as is, is dead as it relates to harmonising and developing relationships throughout the region. The sad reality is that in spite of our common history and shared culture the distance is too great to overcome along with the population and economic disparities.

Trinidad & Tobago along with Barbados (despite the latter’s recent malaise) are streets ahead of every other nation in this bloc in terms of economics, and they flex their muscles much to the chagrin of the other nations in the regional bloc. Jamaica and Trinidad dominate in terms of population size (and therefore have a large labour pool) and we see where their nationals make up a large portion of the workforce in the other nations in the grouping, pressuring wages of the locals downwards (in some cases) while alienating/forcing out of work quite a few of the local populace.

The CSME (Caribbean Single Market & Economy) is non-existent, the ‘freedom of movement’ that CARICOM was supposed to have afforded us is nowhere to be found and ideas of political/legal integration seem to have been strangled in its crib if the CCJ is anything to go by. CARICOM it must be said again as is is dead in the water unless something drastic and earth-shaking takes place, and that event may very well have taken place (or is slowly taking place).

Global warming and the tectonic movements in my mind are going to be the driving force behind the region finally integrating, climate change may very well be the thing that saves this bloc. As seen with the recent hurricanes this season along with the precarious fault line that is between Jamaica and Haiti, the nations of this bloc could literally at any moment face a crisis that would bankrupt any one of the individual nations that make up CARICOM. Rivers and streams are drying up and islands that are used to importing water are now paying through the nose for the same commodity as a result, it cant continue, something must change.

The time for doing nothing has ended, that door slammed shut the minute Dominica got battered by the third category 4 hurricane of what has been a hellish nightmare that is this years hurricane season. Frankly, the door started closing during the five minutes of hell that Haiti endured (the 2010 earthquake). Simply put, stagnation at this point in time is akin to willfully signing our death warrants, the only way out of this mess is with true unification and integration.

CARICOM as a bloc has a population of just under eighteen million persons, almost all of them living on islands, except two. Guyana and Belize are on the continent and are (wait for it) actually underpopulated. If we as a regional bloc were serious about not only political integration but most importantly our peoples survival, then we would look into setting up a plan to get off the islands and move to the continent, the mainland which happens to be CARICOM members as well as being underpopulated and underdeveloped (like all of CARICOM in that regard).

Now, as I have pointed out, these nations are actually pretty underpopulated. Guyana with a land mass of 83,000 sq mi (making it number 83 in terms of country size) has a population of 773,303 as of 2016 (making it number 165 for population size) and therefore one of the least dense places on earth (ranked at number 8). Suriname is a bit smaller but still again a massive nation with a land mass of 63,252 sq mi (ranked at number 90) and with a population just above half a million. These are nations roughly the size of Great Britan (in the case of Guyana) and Greece (in the case of Suriname) and with a fraction of their population, in other words, there is ample room for population expansion. As it relates to the environment (which should be at the forefront of our minds if we even begin to plan this out), I believe that we (at least in this region anyway) have learnt our lessons and would look to do as little damage as possible to the magnificent beauties that make up Guyana-Suriname hinterland, forests and waterways, we wont be doing concrete jungles anymore I believe.

I am not pretending that this is either a roadmap or a policy piece on how to achieve this, that is for persons in a much bigger pay bracket than I can imagine. But it is something that we must at the very least be thinking about and hopefully, this will spark some stimulating conversation on the topic along with concrete actions. The way has already been somewhat paved by the  Guna people of Panama, these people live on the Caribbean side of Panama and as such are seeing their land slowly swallowed up by the ocean as the climate becomes more hostile. As a solution, they are all (within a specified timeline) moving to the mainland of Panama, showing that a solution is out there.

This type of regional cooperation and integration I admit is at this moment very much a pipe dream and honestly seems laughably impossible, however, the alternatives are also just as, if not more so, impossible. Option one is, hope, pray and cajole the nations of the world to meet and surpass (because the current targets will mean the regions extinction) the goals set at the Paris climate talks (a tall order especially with the US pulling out). Option two is, we as individual nations try and make the best of it, build dykes as tall as skyscrapers to keep the water out (see King Canute) and then die (not very pleasant what with these hurricanes, heat etc). Option three is, we all vacate the region and go to the former colonial masters, something that just sounds mad when one looks at current events (see Trump and all of Europe). None of these options are likely or realistic, the truth is we in the region have been left to fend for ourselves, to act as the test case in how well/long humans will live in the front lines in the era of global warming, at this point it is really either swim together or die a slow death for the nations of this region because we are not going to get any outside help.

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Recycling is easier than you think

Jamaica has much natural beauty, stunning views, amazing beaches and rainforests coupled with rivers that can make one’s heart stop with the breathtaking majesty, however, we have one massive blight accompanying this beauty, garbage. Everywhere one looks one sees garbage, be it the beach littered with plastic bottles, the river choked with plastic bags or even the streets where condom wrappers (and used condoms) bag juice bags and boxes rule the roost, we see where Jamaica has a garbage (or more specifically a recycling) problem.

Many excuses are given for why the waste is both scattered about the place and left to pile up. A lack of skips, a lack of bins, a lack of dustmen, poor education as it relates to personal waste management, all are given as excuses for our garbage problems and all are in fact valid statements, however much more could be done as it relates to making the place less filthy.

One excuse we are always greeted with is that plastic (especially bottles and bags) are almost impossible to recycle here and that they just end up in landfills or the waterways clogging things up. That is inexcusable and quite frankly a cop-out as so many things could be done to mitigate this situation. The plastic that we all ignore could be used for so many things and be used in ingenious ways that could also (wait for it) provide jobs in a niche market while also beautifying the nation. I am of course speaking of making art and furniture out of the disposed of plastic.

We could begin by making benches and other seating items. Imagine for example, the bus stop instead of having a rundown shed with the few ‘seats’ that would make your skin crawl instead becoming a new waiting area (the shed would be made of reused plastic) and comfortable plentiful seats so that one could wait for a bus in comfort? Imagine a park with children playing on a see-saw or a swing or even jungle gym all made out of the plastic items that would instead have become garbage clogging the drains? If one looks at the types of art that can be or is already being made with this type of waste material, the stunning quality and beauty, the intricacy that can be done with this garbage, then right there one would see a grand opportunity for our Jamaican artists to actually get their teeth further into a modern medium while at the same time assisting in beautifying the nation. and one Imagine, shoes, slippers, rain slicks and even bags made in Jamaica and all coming from the items that as we speak are causing so much havoc on the nation? A niche market could be created and cemented giving jobs to this nation, and it could come from the garbage.

With garbage and plastic, in particular, choking the nation something needs to be done. Education yes, people will only learn the right things if taught it, putting in skips and bins is a must, people can’t dispose of waste properly if there are no receptacles. However, that will not address the issue of the plastic we currently have and the plastic that we will have in the future that we all agree cant be disposed of in an environmentally friendly way. We are choking on garbage as we speak, even if we manage to scrape up all the plastic in the island more will always wash ashore from the floating garbage piles that occupy the oceans. Instead of whining, instead of doing half measures and instead of ignoring the problem (something we are excellent at) let us address it head-on. This is an easy, cost-effective and quite frankly fun way to reduce the garbage in the nation and is one that ties in well with the proposals that the talking heads have made, let us see now if anything changes.