Tag: Jamaica

Is Jamaica serious about tackling crime?

Is Jamaica serious about tackling crime?

The JCF has killed Duppy Film! Let us break out in song and dance and let us breathe easy, the JCF has it seemed to found their aim again. Over the past two weeks, the JCF has been on a roll, killing up to a dozen dangerous wanted men and having one turn himself in. Some would see this as Jamaica finally taking crime seriously, taking it hard to the criminals and ensuring that they hurt no one else, and while I am elated that these persons can no longer cause such harm to society as they have been alleged to (yes almost none were tried and found guilty so alleged), I can’t help but wonder if by the recent actions of the JCF and the majority of our reactions are we serious about tackling crime or do we only like the idea?

Now before one gets to thinking that this is some piece crying over the ‘fallen soldier’ that is Duppy Film, let me say again no it is not, persons who commit crimes, and persons who commit violent crimes deserve prison, and in some cases a bit more than that. However, that does not blind me to the fact that something is fundamentally wrong with a crime strategy that entails simply ‘kill anything that moves’, or worse still ‘shoot first and questions be damned’, a strategy that totally ignores key questions and a society that seems willfully blind to them.

Now it is not a secret (or maybe an open one) that Duppy Film was well connected, a hired gun he was in hot demand for a time and used by quite a few influential persons. It is also not a secret (again maybe another open one) that he was paid to take out an influential individual. He was found in a part of the island (his home parish admittedly) where the guns for drugs trade and the import/export of drugs is home, and just like that, after seven years on the run, eluding a dragnet of 180 joint JCF-JDF, was found and gunned down out of the blue… does that not strike anyone else as strange? That this man who had answers so so many pertinent and pressing issues, was gunned down just so, after seven years of eluding everyone? To me, something smells fishy about that whole incident.

That is really the point that I am really trying to make here, this not so much to mourn the life that was wasted because the system was set up in such a way that the young man faced a choice of the gun (with its pros and inevitable cons) or play by the rules and be shafted (as is the everyday reality in this nation), no, it is to simply state that as a nation with crime and criminal elements roosted and having taken deep roots in the society and state apparatus, how can we be pleased with the killing of a person who held such key information?

Yes, in all likelihood he was the bloodthirsty killer that we read about in the papers, and that may have been the case with the countless others, but is it any real surprise that after destroying the criminal element without getting the necessary information (for which man living in West Street working as a day labourer can afford a brand new AK-47?) as to who funded him/her, or who their boss is, has only resulted in us looking to smash the 1300 mark for murders this year? Catch them, hold them, convict them, wring the information out of them and then go after the big fishes, that is one of the fastest ways to put a dent in crime.

Let’s not remain the same society that we have been for so long happy with half measures and actions that in the long run will only lead to the national harm. Let’s demand that instead of killing every suspected SOB on site and in every shootout, the JCF instead shoot to wound, say a gut or knee shot, painful but not necessarily lethal, that way we can get the relevant information, lock up the actual power players and truly start ending this crime scourge.

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Recycling is easier than you think

Jamaica has much natural beauty, stunning views, amazing beaches and rainforests coupled with rivers that can make one’s heart stop with the breathtaking majesty, however, we have one massive blight accompanying this beauty, garbage. Everywhere one looks one sees garbage, be it the beach littered with plastic bottles, the river choked with plastic bags or even the streets where condom wrappers (and used condoms) bag juice bags and boxes rule the roost, we see where Jamaica has a garbage (or more specifically a recycling) problem.

Many excuses are given for why the waste is both scattered about the place and left to pile up. A lack of skips, a lack of bins, a lack of dustmen, poor education as it relates to personal waste management, all are given as excuses for our garbage problems and all are in fact valid statements, however much more could be done as it relates to making the place less filthy.

One excuse we are always greeted with is that plastic (especially bottles and bags) are almost impossible to recycle here and that they just end up in landfills or the waterways clogging things up. That is inexcusable and quite frankly a cop-out as so many things could be done to mitigate this situation. The plastic that we all ignore could be used for so many things and be used in ingenious ways that could also (wait for it) provide jobs in a niche market while also beautifying the nation. I am of course speaking of making art and furniture out of the disposed of plastic.

We could begin by making benches and other seating items. Imagine for example, the bus stop instead of having a rundown shed with the few ‘seats’ that would make your skin crawl instead becoming a new waiting area (the shed would be made of reused plastic) and comfortable plentiful seats so that one could wait for a bus in comfort? Imagine a park with children playing on a see-saw or a swing or even jungle gym all made out of the plastic items that would instead have become garbage clogging the drains? If one looks at the types of art that can be or is already being made with this type of waste material, the stunning quality and beauty, the intricacy that can be done with this garbage, then right there one would see a grand opportunity for our Jamaican artists to actually get their teeth further into a modern medium while at the same time assisting in beautifying the nation. and one Imagine, shoes, slippers, rain slicks and even bags made in Jamaica and all coming from the items that as we speak are causing so much havoc on the nation? A niche market could be created and cemented giving jobs to this nation, and it could come from the garbage.

With garbage and plastic, in particular, choking the nation something needs to be done. Education yes, people will only learn the right things if taught it, putting in skips and bins is a must, people can’t dispose of waste properly if there are no receptacles. However, that will not address the issue of the plastic we currently have and the plastic that we will have in the future that we all agree cant be disposed of in an environmentally friendly way. We are choking on garbage as we speak, even if we manage to scrape up all the plastic in the island more will always wash ashore from the floating garbage piles that occupy the oceans. Instead of whining, instead of doing half measures and instead of ignoring the problem (something we are excellent at) let us address it head-on. This is an easy, cost-effective and quite frankly fun way to reduce the garbage in the nation and is one that ties in well with the proposals that the talking heads have made, let us see now if anything changes.

If you’re going to sell yourself, at least be expensive

If you’re going to sell yourself, at least be expensive

Jamaica has been selling off bits and pieces for ages, be it bauxite rights, our port (leased out) or even the sugar belt and Goat Island which has been granted to the Chinese, we see where Jamaica has been slowly at first, but rather quickly recently, giving away key areas and industries of the nation. Now, this has naturally brought out the nationalistic tendencies in us human beings that inhabit this island, we have been demanding that the government reverse these policies and staunchly go it alone, or at the very most engage in trade with others while retaining sovereignty of our key industries (electricity, bauxite etc). Now I am staunchly in this camp, I feel that alone (really as a unified Caribbean basin) we can have a real go at making something of ourselves as a nation and region.

That, however, for the time being, is a pipe dream. The powers that be are intent on selling off any area and aspect of the nation that can turn a quick few $US million. Now I don’t agree with this line of thinking, but if our leaders are indeed going down the road of selling off everything lock-stock and barrel then by god let us ensure that they get quite a few $US Billion while also ensuring that the people (that would be us the citizens of the neo-colony) get some benefits.

Take for example the on again off again sale of Goat Island and the aborted deal for the port (both Chinese deals), it is obvious that the Chinese are looking for a firm foothold in the region, more specifically the areas in the region closest to the major shipping lanes (from the Panama Canal to the Port of Miami and further up the eastern US seaboard), that is why they have pumped so much money into the Cuban refitting of the Port of Mariel. Now the Chinese are not silly, they know that absolutely no cargo ships are allowed to dock in the US after directly docking at Cuba, they need a mid-point therefore. This is where Jamaica and us being a potential expensive hoe come into play. If they want the port and the Island and the Government is intent on selling it, then sell it, but go big. Sell them both for XBillion US$ and demand concessions and access to the port, sell them and insist that they fund and train our merchant marine fleet (which they will need for their ships coming in) so that we can have some lasting benefits as it relates to the individual Jamaican.

 

 

 

The mining rights is also a case of the same thing. China is the hub of global industry and manufacturing and is also fast ascending as it relates to R&D, therefore it is natural that they want to (and they are) monopolize the minerals of the world. Again we see where the differing administrations are intent on selling it to the Chinese, in line with the old school sell-offs where we end up carrying the bag. It doesn’t have to be this way, Let us sell it to them, but let us make them pay dearly. Insist that when we sell the bauxite rights (again for a cool X Billion $US), demand in the deal that the roads and rail networks are upgraded. This again is something  that would benefit both parties, the Chinese would need good, reliable transportation networks to transport the minerals (or processed aluminum) to the docks so that they can be loaded into the awaiting ships, we the Jamaican citizen would also benefit greatly as we would then have cash on hand along with a brand new road and rail network we didn’t have to build.

Now I am not saying that the Chinese are looking to or are going to become our new colonial overlords, I have never been in that camp and the facts (though they point to exploitation and no-strings-attached loans/grants) do not point in that direction, they do however wish to gain a permanent foothold in the region as they aim to cement their status as the next global behemoth. If we are going to sell our souls, sell off our natural gifts and key industries, then lets at least have something to show for it, let it not be a case of us selling off everything we have only to realize that we own nothing, have access to nothing and are left scrounging for the ‘what lef’ in ways that would make our current reality look like a fun game.

Can the PNP become relevant again?

Can the PNP become relevant again?

The PNP is in turmoil, with the internal elections now looking like a matter of a royal hand over (as seen with Dr Davies and Mr Golding and now Mrs Simpson-Miller and Mrs Brown-Burke) and the elevation and retention of persons who have proved to be ideologically bankrupt and inept as it relates to policy formation and implementation some serious questions need to be asked about whether this party can become more than the joke that it currently is. The party is on shaky ground and as things stand right now, even though the JLP is on the ropes in peoples minds, they do not see any other alternative as the PNP continues to cannibalise itself and stagnate.

omar-davies

Right now the PNP, in theory, should be in the ascendancy especially since they lost the last election by only two seats and we have a JLP government that seems to be lumbering incompetently along until the next election and instead of putting up an actual challenge we see them as a party fighting over the parochial spoils and positioning for the future.

We see this everywhere, for example during the recent internal (farce) election to fill the void left by the resignation of Portia Simpson-Miller, we saw all of the party bigwigs such as Paulwell all coalesce around Angela Brown-Burke, this was made all the more surprising since Angela didn’t even register and was nowhere in the polls. The farce continued when Simpson-Miller openly endorses Brown-Burke by claiming, and I kid you not that, she would ‘continue the legacy I have built in South West St. Andrew‘. This is a party that at every real or perceived misstep by the government is there baiting it on while offering little to nothing as it relates to an alternative, they are a party lost ideologically and seemingly failing at the one thing they were good at for twenty years, getting the votes.

The PNP has become so toxic and reviled, that even when it raises sound questions (such as the issues with the current ZOSO), they are shot down as either being purely opportunistic (playing politics with crime) or (and this is the cruncher) as being two-faced, as they now race to find fault with a law that they willingly let slide through with the farcical debate on its contents.

The party is bereft of anything relating to a core ideology and are now throwing anything at the wall in the hope that it will stick, as seen with PNP operatives writing letters lambasting the PM for sending aid (conveniently forgetting that Caribbean integration is supposedly a core PNP philosophy).

The PNP is in freefall mode, its senior ranks know that the days of Peter Phillips are limited, and rather than focusing on fixing the severely broken party, rather than coming up with concrete solutions (the five point plan on crime is utter drivel), they instead wage an open war of succession while denying it in the media (as if we are all fools). The PNP had better shape up and do it fast, it needs to admit its failings and come with some fresh ideas (a fresh outlook on socialism is much needed for example), it must champion the causes of the Jamaican people without doing it solely for power (see the many calls for Republican status), if not, then they will have to get used to constant internal conflicts and perpetual opposition status, because as bad as the JLP is, they at least have a plan, and that’s all the people want right now.

Beating a dead horse (Why the crime bill won’t solve much)

Beating a dead horse (Why the crime bill won’t solve much)

Finally, after over a year of dilly-dallying the government has passed a bill aimed at ridding the nation of violence (mainly caused by gangs and inflicted by the gun). The bill sailed through the lower house with bi-partisan approval, and though the debate in the Senate went on for quite some time, it got passed again with bi-partisan support. The law as it is now and has been passed allows for the security forces (through the PM and his security council) can declare anywhere a zone of special operations. Some people look at the new law as a breath of fresh air which will see us being both ‘tough on crime while fixing the causes’, but though this bill may make some who reside in the affluent neighborhoods feel like something positive is being done the reality is that no lasting positive changes will be made by this bill while it opens the way for Jamaica to become a police state.

This bill, much like its failed predecessor the Suppression of Crime Act, will come to nothing more than poor people being taken advantage of while failing to actually address the root causes of crime. It is very backwards and in many ways puts the cart before the horse. The prime example being the ‘clear, hold, build’ model that they have been touting. Now it sounds good and that it is a straightforward fix, but ask yourself, where are these members of the social service who are to ‘build’ coming from? When last did you see an advert in the papers recruiting for this key job, this job that is at the heart of this plan? Are we to send in the already stretched CDA or some other underfunded, undermanned and overstretched agency?

While much talk and hot air has been wasted on the areas of crime, no one during this entire debate has looked at what is possibly the biggest thing stopping us from fighting crime, uptown and monied Jamaicans. It is no secret that certain persons who live in the rarefied areas like Cherry Gardens are the ones who finance the guns coming into the wharf to arm men in the ghetto who can’t even buy chicken back. We have seen where this model will lead us, we saw it in the 70’s=90’s, and for those of us too young to remember what that looked like, look no further than Brazil and Rio where even after a decade of ‘clear, hold and build’ for the Olympics and World Cup the favelas are still just as violent as before, only with more police brutality.

The law as written and passed is actually mind-boggling in parts, it strips us of our freedoms and liberties while putting far too much power in the hands of a notoriously corrupt constabulary, the army (which isn’t viewed in a much better light) and a small group of overreaching politicians. It gives the security forces such arbitrary powers under very vague circumstances that are open to abuse, take for example Objects of Act 3 (d): Empowers members of the Joint Force to search a person, vehicle or place without a warrant, within a zone, if they reasonably suspect that an offence has been, is being or is about to be committed.  That bit of legislation is so wide and expansive that it, in reality, will enable the Force to search anywhere in that zone because they have a hunch, no actual proof. A piece of legislation that opens the public up to arbitrary and unjustified stops and searches because a crime is being committed nearby, it is the lazy man’s police work.

Then we get into the fact that it opens the nation up to the rule of an executive PM as opposed to one who acts with the consent of and after consultation and agreement with his Cabinet. This can be seen in Zone of special operation, Declaration of Zone 4(1) The Prime Minister in Council, may, by order, declare any geographically defined area within a single continuous boundary in Jamaica, as a zone of special operations for a period not exceeding sixty days if the circumstances set out in subsection (2) exist.

Now, regardless of how stringent the regulations of subsection (2) are (and they are actually pretty black and white), we have seen on a daily basis where persons from both parties both while in government and opposition frequently play fast and loose (or just being plain corrupt) with the law and freely associate with known criminals. We see where laws are implemented on certain persons or groups based on partisan loyalty and who can pay the most and that up to today has not changed, therefore asking us to accept the Prime Minister will have almost unchecked power as it relates to both when, where, how long and who leads these zones is utter insanity as we have seen where they can be (and are) so destructive with the limited amount of power that they have.

haggartfunerald20010508rb(Peter Phillips, Omar Davies and Karl Blythe at Willie Haggarts funeral)

With scamming now almost half of what tourism brings into the coffers of this nation (almost one billion dollars according to a VICE article) how do we expect to get these young men (and women) who have been inculcated with this get rich quick mentality? With the drug scene still prevalent (and really at its same monstrous heights since the deportation of Coke and Ramcharan) where are the plans that we should be putting in place to break the deadly underground and illegal triangular trade we have with the Colombians and the Mexicans (the Mexicans who now control some of our largest and most profitable illegal ganja fields)? Where is the plan to strengthen the border to stop criminals from foreign lands coming to our shores to assist in doing us so much harm, a simple walk to any bar on Water Lane in the vicinity of West Street downtown will have you hearing French creole (in the Haitian dialect) and Spanish (in the dialect of persons from the Dom Rep, Colombia and Mexico), without a safe border how will the crime and the importation of guns be stemmed?

drugRamcharan

With corruption permeating throughout all layers of the Jamaican government institutions just how exactly will this crime bill help stem crime long term? When a man can bribe the customs agent and security to turn a blind eye to guns coming into and narcotics exiting the nation how exactly will the crime end? Going back to ports of entry and exit, the airport is so lax that one has to wonder if we really do have a crime problem and all that it carries, especially when one realizes that a lot of the drugs are going through because there is a network of gang members working as security officers and the persons who check the bags that go into the cargo hold of the plane. This is common knowledge and has been for years yet we can’t (or don’t want to) even manage to crack that illegal ring of drug smugglers, yet we are to rest assured that the same men and women who can’t do the simplest of tasks relating to anti-corruption and crime prevention and fighting will solve the crime problem with a bill that strips us all (but really the poor) of all our legal rights and free to be treated like chattel.

With little to naught being done to tackle the root of crime (such as chronic poverty, a lack of education and little hope of finding a decent job and housing etc) coupled with the total lack of any agenda of tackling those who both finance and profit from the crime that has taken root in the nation then we can safely assume that this Zone of Special Operation will be a dud. It is nothing but a sick repetition of the Suppression Of Crime Act and the results will be the same, an abject failure coupled with the eventual spike in violent crime. Instead of aiming for the ‘silver bullet’ to forever eliminate crime (which doesn’t exist) let us instead roll up our sleeves and do the hard work of actually tackling crime. Let’s improve our education system, employ our people and ensure that poverty becomes a thing of the past, let’s aim to rid ourselves of the rats uptown so that they can stop offering spurious claims of get-rich quick schemes to the kids in the ghetto who only want to eat and see no way out, if not then lets give the keys of state to the army and police as this bill already leaves the door ajar for them to take it.

 

P.S. Read the Act here for further spine tingling revelations of just what is in store for us

Why Jamaica in historical terms is actually not doing badly.

Why Jamaica in historical terms is actually not doing badly.

This may come as a surprise to those (few) persons who read what I post, but Jamaica actually isn’t doing badly. Now before you start thinking that I have been smoking too many spliffs and am somewhere in Lala land you have to understand just what I mean when I say that Jamaica is really not in that bad a position. When I say that I mean from a historical perspective, in terms of the life of a nation, from the birth of it to the fall of it, Jamaica is looking not too shabby for a nation of fifty-five years.

Let us look at it piece by piece and with analogies and comparisons. Jamaica in its seventy-seven years of self-rule and fifty-five years of self-governance has had always had a (relatively speaking) peaceful transfer of power, even the much talked about, highly contested and bloody election of 1980 ended with Michael Manley handing power over to Edward Seaga without calling out the tanks. Note that even the less talked about (but no less hard fought) election of 1976, with the state of emergency, ended with Edward Seaga sitting as an MP and leader of the opposition till his aforementioned victory in ’80. Now compare that to other newly independent nations, but just to ‘handicap’ myself, compare that to other newly independent former British colonies. Guyana (which was deprived of independence because of British and American fears of Soviet influence with the Premier Cheddi Jagan and his wife) remained under the brutal one-party rule of Forbes Burnham (which incidentally murdered the great Dr Walter Rodney) for some twenty years. Grenada was run by the madman Eric Gairy after independence in 1974 to the point that a revolution took place to oust him a mere five years later and installed the New JEWEL Movement led by the left-wing Maurice Bishop, who was in turn murdered (and whose murder led to a joint US Caribbean invasion). Leaving CARICOM one sees the same thing, Zimbabwe in Africa has brutal crackdowns and a virtual one party-state, while in Asia we have Pakistan which lurches from military dictator to military dictator and even Fiji in the South Pacific has tasted the bitter fruit of election results being literally fought over and the military installing itself in executive power.Millitary Coup

Looking at it from an economic stance Jamaica, while not performing in a stellar fashion, in historical terms and for the age of the nation we are not in a bad position. Yes, the Jamaican economy isn’t much to look at, but take a look right next door to Haiti and you will see what economic ruin truly looks like, the picture below shows statistics up to 2007.

haiti_economic_stats_2007

Now, these stats are initially sourced from the UN, note the glaring absence of any statistics for anything relating to employment rates and economic activity. That is not saying that no economic activity takes place or that they are all unemployed, far from it, in fact, many Haitians hold jobs (many more than one) and run businesses, the problem is that most of the jobs are low paying (to put it politely) and most businesses are in the informal sector and therefore either struggling to get by or just not giving anything meaningful to the economy (see the black market). Again I go back to poor Zimbabwe, their economy has fallen off a cliff since 2000 and a nation that once was the ‘breadbasket’ of the region coupled with a robust labour force has an economy so in tatters that they not only had the highest inflation rates at one point in time, they abandoned their currency altogether and now use FX to grease the wheels of the broken-down economy. Yes Jamaica got FINSAC’ed, yes we haven’t had any meaningful growth for some twenty odd years and yes we have a worrying rate of unemployment, but as mentioned above things could be so much worse.

We have in our nation an issue of safe seats, or to give them their correct name, garrison seats where we know during each election cycle that if an old, shabby broom was put up as the candidate of the ‘influential’ party that it would win by a landslide and then some. But even here, when it comes to incumbents holding onto seats we are not doing all that badly. Take everyone’s favourite (until Trump at least) country America, in 2010 during the midterm elections Congress (both houses) had a 15% approval rating, and yet still the House saw a rate of incumbency return of 90% while the Senate saw an incumbency return of 91%. Now say what you will about the (few) persons who do vote in our local elections but we have a rate of return nowhere near that (partially because we tend to chop and change back benchers) but also because we have a tendency to throw out (the non-influential) those who they feel don’t represent them, as the PNP found out as Mr Arlando lost to Mr Arlando (confusing I know).

US incumbents percent

Another serious issue with Jamaica is political corruption, pork belly politics and corruption in general in all ways shapes and forms. I mince no words when I say that corruption (along with crime and poverty) is a serious millstone around our neck and that if we hope to better our nation then we have to rid ourselves of corruption.  However, for a nation that again has only been policing itself for 55 years, we have some good (albeit currently toothless) anti-corruption agencies and civic groups (which aren’t toothless) which look to stem the tide of corruption in politics. Again using a historical example (again the US), we have what is probably the most blatant example of political patronage (read corruption) in Tammany Hall founded in 1789 and only dissolved a mere fifty years ago (which was historically corrupt from its inception) and its infamous (and notoriously corrupt) head William M. Tweed. Tammany Hall was The Democratic Party political machine in New York, and it ensured that the Democratic Party had both Ney York City and New York State under lock and key through both bribery along with voter intimidation and patronage. Things got so bad that in a nation that was littered with political machines operating in this nature, Tammany Hall came to epitomise and eclipse all of them in the scale and openness of its corruption.

Political corruption was (and still remains actually) such a problem in the US that even the ‘great’ JFK wasn’t immune from scandal. During his election against Nixon his camp was accused (and the evidence does deserve some looking at) of vote buying and rigging that the US$20 was jokingly nicknamed after JFK. Now Jamaica does have a big corruption problem, however, it is my view that it not as entrenched as we make it out to be, it is that we simply watch it and say nothing so the little that is grafted and gifted (a case of Guinness ain’t all that expensive)  adds up.

All in all what I’m trying to say is that Jamaica, while it has its serious issues (mainly the murder rate which is mind-boggling), has potential and isn’t in the bad place that we like to believe we are as we are still a young nation with time on our side (unless the sea levels begin to rise), and as pointed out above things could be a lot worse. Put another way there is two types of shit in the world, horseshit and dogshit, both are waste materials but one simply can’t be used while the other can be used to fertilize a garden (it has potential). In a frank and crass manner, yes we are shit, a bad economy and a society that is scared, but we are horseshit, it is up to us now as to whether we use or potential or we allow it to remain wasted.

Time to do right by the Boyz​

Time to do right by the Boyz​

Jamaican football has been in a slump for quite some time now, with the level of play in the local senior league sometimes at a standard that is more akin to the English League Two (the fourth division) the Jamaican football fan has been starved for quality on a local basis. For almost twenty years that slump also extended to the men’s senior football team, our beloved Reggae Boyz. Since their historic qualification for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, the side has drifted from disappointment (as when we failed at the last hurdle to qualify for the World Cup in 2002) to downright embarrassment and dejection (as was the case with the 6-0 that England gave us in preparation for another World Cup that we failed to qualify for), all that however seems to have changed.

The Boyz in the last two major CONCACAF tournaments (note: not CFU or CONMEBOL) have done exceedingly well, going above and beyond the expectations that most if not all of us had. In the past two Gold Cups, the Boyz have managed to reach the finals on both occasions while playing what can only be described as good looking (not Barcelona sexy) football and regaining the defensive prowess that led us to that historic ’98 qualification. What makes these performances all the more remarkable is that they did it with (1) a whole bunch of local players (though in truth it was a mixed contingent that did the deeds in 2015) and (2) they did it at a time when football in Jamaica is desperately short of cash.

CONCACAF2017-NEWS_1170x540-7fd3107704

At a time when businesses (not so much the people) are making profits hand over fist (see Bank of Nova Scotia Jamaica Ltd) and listing on the JSE and junior stock market (see Proven Investment Ltd) to rake in billions, the JFF should really look into getting some much needed finances from these institutions. The Reggae Boyz have kept up their end of the bargain so far what with the two finals and as such the private sector should hold up its end of the bargain and start to pump money into (after seeing an actual feasible long term plan with set deadlines) our local football program so that we can ensure that these performances are not just ‘buckups’ as we Jamaicans would say.

The problem certainly isn’t a lack of cash in the nation, as track and field shows, there is money in this nation and I am probably being a little harsh on the private sector who have in the past funded the JFF (like Stewarts Motors which has been by the Boyz side through thick and thin) sometimes to the detriment of other sporting disciplines. The private sector is scared (and scarred) to invest in football because of the countless false dawns that the national team have had and the complacency (often times bordering on ineptitude) the JFF have had over the past twenty years. However as mentioned previously the Boyz have done exceedingly well on a relative shoestring budget and seem to have the makings of a long term plan and as such at least deserve to be listened to (if not actively prodded into) as it relates to football and how it will improve further.

The Reggae Boyz have done well, they deserve the plaudits that they have been receiving as well as the hype and inevitable big money transfer rumours. More needs to be done however if we are to not only retain this good run of form but (and this is the most important thing) to kick off from there and make serious gains not only in the region but the world. This can only be done if the game has a serious cash infusion from the private sector and that will only happen if the JFF presents an actual well thought out plan for the game and its future in Jamaica, if not then this will be a repeat of ’98 and we will have to wait another two decades for some form of footballing enjoyment on the international (let alone regional) stage.

Doing right by the ‘gully queens’ will make us a better society

Doing right by the ‘gully queens’ will make us a better society

For almost a decade Jamaica in general and New Kingston, in particular, has been wrestling with what exactly should happen to the homosexual men who frequent the area and live in the Shoemaker gully, giving them the epitaph ‘gully queens’ as some of them engage in cross-dressing. There has been much debate publicly about what should be done with them and how they interact with the persons who both live, go to school and work in the vicinity of the Shoemaker gully as they have for some time now taken to crime to support themselves. Most have suggested just abandoning them to the gods and fate while others state that they should all be scraped up and sent to prison, both stances I feel are horribly wrong.

Instead of condemning these men who have been through and continue to live in a hell, not of their choosing we should look to help them and ensure that such a horrid situation is never repeated. These gay men are persons who are the equivalent of the ‘untouchable’ caste in India and they do not deserve the extra oppression meted out to them by living in conditions that most couldn’t even fathom let alone live in.

It is true that they haven’t helped themselves, they were at a J-FLAG house and because of their boisterous (see butu) behaviour they were forced to leave the premises, but that is no reason as to why the state or civil society couldn’t provide them with decent housing and accommodations. A recent article in the Jamaica Star has highlighted the fact that the ‘gully queens’ have started a GoFundMe page in order to either find a place to rent/lease or buy and live in, however, the project hit a roadblock as they have only managed to raise $9,014 of a $100,000 (USD) or $1,151,993 of $12,780,042 JMD. I feel that the Jamaican government in conjunction with some civil society groups should front these desperate men the rest of the cash and or provide them with the required housing, but they shouldn’t stop there. A big reason why they were kicked out of the J-Flag accommodations was that they were both butu and utterly destructive of the place and had no real regard for their surroundings. This place of refuge or sanctuary that you would be providing these runaway homosexual men could teach them the social skills needed to interact and operate in a society that sees them as abnormal and the threat of violence against them is constantly bubbling.

This is not a matter of whether or not you are in the pro or anti gay, this is about basic human dignity and decency. Yes they are not all that to look at, yes they are butu and yes they have committed crimes (some as serious as armed robbery) but just how are they any different from the MP who even after blatant shady actions is welcomed back with chimes of ‘second chances’ or the businessman who avoids jail because he is ‘contrite’ and shows his ‘remorse’ publicly? Let us put personal taste and do the right thing, because as Jesus showed in the parable tables turn and one day we may be the Judean laying dying on the ground only to be saved by the ‘unclean’ Samaritan.

Modern day feudalism and Jamaica

Modern day feudalism and Jamaica

The world is always changing nothing remains the same. We see this in technology medicine however one thing remains the same, the way we humans interact with each other. We see this from all stratas of society, human beings have seldom changed and the more one looks at it the more the situation reads like an awful novel.

Feudalism is alive and well in this society, though we all seldom speak on it for fear of losing secure jobs and possibly one’s life. We see this played out throughout the society but one example that I feel cements us in the mode of politics is the relationship between the area don and the girl children. The don (since he protects the area) gets ‘jus primae noctis‘ providing the masters with the right of being the first one to sleep with a womanThis phenomenon is not new to Jamaica, it has been going on since the inception of the garrison and yet we as a society, for the most part, remain silent as that type of madness, barbarity and utter backwardness continues unabated.

This feudalism in the nation can be found some more in the garrison where persons live the lives of twelfth-century serfs, beholden to the Lord of the land. We see this in the way that the don of the area is able to (usually by coercion) get the loyalty of the persons living in his ‘city state’ and they go off to war merrily to fight for him, for the spoils that will be divided and for the indulgences from the don, in the same manner as the Popes of old led the world to Crusade after Crusade. We see this neo-feudalism in the city centres and parish capitals as a crude ‘tax’, ‘protection’ or if you will just plain extortion is played out on a daily basis. Much like the feudal lords of the past who would take their share of the harvest (the best of course!) because the serf was unlucky enough to have been living under ‘patronage’ so we have the modern don taking the hard earned money of business persons and higglers who are unlucky enough to be in their zone of influence.

The political system while not explicitly built around the feudal line is clearly operated along the line that would make any feudal lord pleased that the trend continues. The political system that we currently have in breeds patronage and the creating and holding of fiefdoms (or garrisons in Jamaican parlance) and the handing over of that fiefdom to the chosen heir. Nowhere was this more open and blatant than the recent election to replace Dr Omar Davies in his ‘Jungle’ garrison constituency when he openly called for and endorsed Mr Mark Golding to be his eventual successor (and we see the tradition continuing with Portia Simpson-Miller openly endorsing Dr.Angela Brown-Burke).

Again much like their feudal spiritual ancestors, the politicians practice a serious form of nepotism that would be hilarious if the results weren’t so harmful to the nation. Just look at the current parliament and one is shocked at the blatant nepotism, Andrew and Juliet Holness (husband and wife), Peter and Mikael Phillips (father and son), Pearnel Charles and Pearnel Charles Jr (again father and son), and that is just those who have immediate blood connections and are currently serving. If we were to add the second and sometimes third generations that are in our parliament and senate (such as Minister Johnson-Smith and Mr McNeill then most people would agree that nepotism is the order of the day when it comes to politics, I mean for heavens sake (and I admit this is a slight stretch), Bustamante, Manley and Shearer were all from the same family branch and all three took turns (Alexander, Norman, Hugh then Michael) running the country consecutively from ’44-92 with a brief interlude of 48 days during the tenure of Sir Donald Sangster and the premiership of Edward Seaga which lasted from 80-89, does that not strike you as some feudal politics?

It is not just the political system and the dons that function or are run in a feudal or neo-feudal way, society, in general, seems to operate in a way that is shockingly reminiscent of feudalism. The way that businesses operate and treat their employees (just take a look at any wholesale and you will see individuals working in conditions that can only be described as modern day feudalism), they are tied to the companies just as the feudal serf was tied to the land. Be it the cash advance that the company forwards to you, the loan with the unseemly interest rate that your job offers you (some call centers offer this treat) or the fact that you owe them for things such as travel and education (all of which sound reasonable until you see the unreasonable interest rates) one sees where this type of thinking and operating runs like a river throughout our society.

This just seems to be the runnings of things in this nation, we the citizens have allowed it to be so but it can change. The change won’t be easy but it can be done and is being done slowly, be it groups like NIA that are (trying at least to) calling out corruption or CAPRI, JFJ and the active social and political groups which in their own way seek to liberate peoples minds which is the beginning of the end of feudalism. This oppression in the nation will end, whether it is replaced by a totally new form of oppression or a system that is more just, fair and equitable is to be seen but it will end.

Jamaica: Shirking its role as a voice against global injustice

Jamaica has never been a shrinking violet on the international scene. Far from it, we have historically punched above our weight and even led campaigns against the injustices that were taking place. Even when our nation was going through great turmoils like the 70’s and the 90’s we were always leading the charge or in full support in calling out the global injustices, be it Southern Africa, Greneda or Cuba we have always had a strong voice and compelling opinions on these issues.

All that seems to have changed however, as over the past thirteen years (when we helped Aristide escape the US backed coup) we have been silent on the pressing issues facing us all. We have shirked our responsibility and forgone our history in order to remain silent and try to suck at the teet of high finance and political power.

Examples of our deafening silence are many and would put persons who left the nation in the 70’s-80’s and those who remember our vocal attitude to shame. We have done nothing for almost twenty years as the world burns around us and as injustices continue to be meted out. A prime example of this and one that we as a nation should be profoundly disappointed with can be found in how we deal with Africa and more to the point Congo (the DRC). This is a nation that has been at constant internal conflict since independence but which has seen the conflict become more heated and brutal in the past few decades. With wanton raping, destruction of villages, the virtual (and sometimes literal) slavery that is the norm in the precious metals and stones mines and the (now common) use of child soldiers we see where we have foreign ministers (from both parties) who are silent on this issue, yet they like to speak of black solidarity, how sickening.

Taking a look a little closer to home and we see the same thing being done by the Jamaican government. The coup of 2009 in Honduras which was condemned by almost all of the world (and admittedly the OAS) was met with a tepid reply of support for the recently ousted president by the Jamaican government and opposition. The political and social situation in Guyana is devolving at a frightening pace (although their economy is doing ok) to the point where we now have a political party, centered around race openly calling for the abandonment of CARICOM among some other radical reforms. The same thing plays out in the nation that should have been a beacon of anti-imperialism but which instead was and still is being destroyed by imperialist and neo-colonial powers, Haiti. As the nation endured (and still does endure) economic devastation persons crossed the border to the Dominican Republic to find economic refuge. To cut a long story short, the descendants of those immigrants are now being (and have been historically) systematically oppressed, arrested and deported. These persons are being held in squalid conditions in detention centers and daily face racist abuse and physical abuse until they are ‘deported to their country of origin’ all for the crime of being black, poor and therefore not having ‘proper’ identification of citizenship. Again we got the same tired and lame condemnations from the opposition and government,but no concrete steps were taken to shame let  alone sanction the Dom Rep government. Again we were silent and are silent as we do business with them as they continue to carry out those atrocities, we have become whores for a few cents and sold our soul in the process.

In Asia the same thing plays out, we readily accept money from the Chinese and never once have we called them out on some of their practices that are nothing short of reprehensible (and incidentally sometimes totally against the ‘orthodoxy’ the CPC preaches). We are silent as Myanmar cum Burma is still embroiled in civil war and ethnic cleansing and instead of calling them out or at least making vocal our displeasure we say nothing at all. Even in the ‘conflict of our times’ the war against ISIS and Islamic militancy our government and opposition only come out of the woodwork’s when a bombing happens as in London (but strangely never when it happens in Nigeria) showing just how much of our once proud heritage of being vocal and active on the international scene has been withered like a grape on the vine.

Nothing though shows the Jamaican government (and opposition’s) total lack of morals and humanity than the recent visit of our Prime Minster to Israel, an act I will always and forever decry and oppose. During this trip, never once did he the head of the Jamaican  government come out publicly and denounce and condemn what Israel has done and continues to do, instead we got a photo-op and cushy smiles while Palestinians were being oppressed. No, we didn’t condemn them or tell them off as we did their spiritual predecessor apartheid South Africa, instead we fawned over their (albeit impressive) technological systems and irrigation systems, ignoring the fact that it was literally built on and watering stolen Palestinian land. And while that oppression continues unabated (and still ratcheting up) we have a government and opposition say nothing, while Palestinian men and women are being killed protesting access to their religions third most holy site we have a government putting machinery in gear to welcome the war criminal, war hawk and Zionist expansionist Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu.

The Jamaican government has lost its soul, it has been that way for some time that much is clear. They will do anything for a buck and will stay silent when the most oppressive things take place even in their own backyard and that is sad. We have lost our voice, have shirked our responsibility as a vocal proponent of international justice and human rights and that needs to change. The people of Jamaica are very knowledgeable of foreign affairs and for the most part are disgusted by what is happening, so why isn’t our government speaking on our behalf as our representatives instead of having disgusting public brawls over garrison seats? We must demand a change, we must insist that our representatives call out international crimes and oppression and uphold our proud heritage, and not just because we used to do it but because it is the right thing to do and history will rebuke us if they don’t.